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Seraphan
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Postby Seraphan » 05 Dec 2008 12:50

Frybread wrote:
Seraphan wrote:Lol, on the last pic it says "Many of Kevin's titles are out of print or extremely hard to find". I wonder why... :roll:


Kevin will say it's because they sell so quickly bookstores can't keep them in stock. ;)

Especially in winter, gotta feed the fireplace :lol:
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Postby TheDukester » 05 Dec 2008 13:03

Seraphan wrote:Lol, on the last pic it says "Many of Kevin's titles are out of print or extremely hard to find".

And don't forget the huge collector's market for Kevin J. Anderson items. I mean, seriously, have you seen some of the prices his stuff goes for on eBay? Those KJA fans are madmen! Madmen, I say! :wink:
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Postby Bijaz » 05 Dec 2008 13:29

SandChigger wrote:I'm holding onto it, Darling!

:lol:


The expression on Brian's face looks like someone who was goosed but pleasantly surprised...("Oh! Ohhh...") as Kevin looks into the camera with that cheeky smile unaware there's a gap between the book stacks. Oops!
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Postby SandRider » 05 Dec 2008 13:34

Is Keith really that short or is Brian standing on something ?
(like his father's body ?)
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Mr. Teg
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Postby Mr. Teg » 05 Dec 2008 18:53

Baraka Bryan wrote:
Bijaz wrote:
SandChigger wrote:I'm holding onto it, Darling!

:lol:


The expression on Brian's face looks like someone who was goosed but pleasantly surprised...("Oh! Ohhh...") as Kevin looks into the camera with that cheeky smile unaware there's a gap between the book stacks. Oops!


he's just pullin the puppet strings


Well, pullin something :D
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SandChigger
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Postby SandChigger » 05 Dec 2008 19:00

Baraka Bryan wrote:he's just pullin the puppet strings

Plural? :shock:

You mean, Brian has more than one?
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Postby Bijaz » 05 Dec 2008 19:26

SandChigger wrote:
Baraka Bryan wrote:he's just pullin the puppet strings

Plural? :shock:

You mean, Brian has more than one?


Perhaps the blur of Kevin's hands confused Baraka Bryan :D
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SandChigger
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Postby SandChigger » 05 Dec 2008 19:53

"Is it supposed to be this soft?"
"Let the dead give water to the dead. As for me, it's NO MORE FUCKING TEARS!"

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Postby TheDukester » 05 Dec 2008 21:08

"I don't like every writer's style; for instance, I have never been able to get through Ursula LeGuin, China Mieville, or Iain Banks, all of whom are critical darlings." —Kevin J. Anderson

+++++

So I'm out today and make a quick stop at the local hole-in-the-wall used book store (interesting place: paperbacks only; no hardbacks allowed). And I'm looking around, feeling the urge to get something but not knowing what, when I remember Chiggy's fabulous signature.

So, thanks, Kevvie! I think I'll see what it is you're so jealous of ... I mean, other than her multiple Hugos and Nebulas and her EIGHTEEN Locus awards.

Oh, BTW, there was an entire row of your books there, Hacky. Along with a faint layer of dust.

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Postby GamePlayer » 05 Dec 2008 22:05

Kevin J Anderson wrote:I don't like every writer's style; for instance, I have never been able to get through Ursula LeGuin, China Mieville, or Iain Banks, all of whom are critical darlings.


I should add this quote from KJA to my "diagnosis" page. If this guy could come across as any more bitter about his complete lack of talent, he'd have to be wearing a dunce cap :)
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Postby SandChigger » 05 Dec 2008 22:44

The problem for Kevvy is, it's not just the critics that love Le Guin, for example.

I forget how old I was when I read A Wizard of Earthsea and the other books in that series, but it remains one of the few fantasy series I have (or will) read. And her science fiction books remain interesting enough for a reread every decade or so. ;)

Unlike Kevvy, Le Guin is an artist in such control of her medium that she can target her audience, writing both fantasy and science fiction, for adults and young adults. Everything Kevvy writes reads like YA fantasy.
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Postby GamePlayer » 06 Dec 2008 00:48

Oh, the problems for KJA are just beginning with those authors. Unlike "Kevvy", who still cannot maintain a career without writing dead author exploitation novels, LeGuin, Mieville, and Banks are all successful critically and financially via the creation of their own unique works :)

Poor KJA; he makes it almost too easy to be bashed. Almost :)
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Postby Robspierre » 06 Dec 2008 02:52

SandChigger wrote:
Unlike Kevvy, Le Guin is an artist in such control of her medium that she can target her audience, writing both fantasy and science fiction, for adults and young adults. Everything Kevvy writes reads like YA fantasy.


No, most YA published today is way better than the shit the hack soews forth. Little Brother runs circles around his Dune attempts.

Rob

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Postby SandChigger » 06 Dec 2008 03:17

I stand corrected. ;)
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Postby Mandy » 06 Dec 2008 18:18

Le Guin's YA stuff is so good, it's hard to tell it was written for young adults. She writes with the expectation that her readers are smart enough to get it.

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Postby SandChigger » 06 Dec 2008 20:39

Just like FH did.

Why would people read and love a writer that wrote down to them like they were stupid? :?


People too stupid to realize what was happening? :shock:


Hey, SIMON! :P
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Postby Omphalos » 06 Dec 2008 22:31

Mandy wrote:Le Guin's YA stuff is so good, it's hard to tell it was written for young adults. She writes with the expectation that her readers are smart enough to get it.


All good YA is like that. And there is plenty of it out there.

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Postby Robspierre » 07 Dec 2008 00:38

Omphalos wrote:
Mandy wrote:Le Guin's YA stuff is so good, it's hard to tell it was written for young adults. She writes with the expectation that her readers are smart enough to get it.


All good YA is like that. And there is plenty of it out there.


Yes there is. In fact I'm finding that more of the YA material published is often superior to the "adult" lines being published. They have plots, strong characterization, follow the rules of the universe they lay down and often are more thought provoking than many adult works.

Rob

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Postby Mandy » 07 Dec 2008 16:28

I hadn't noticed a lot of great YA stuff out there. I loved Pullman's His Dark Materials series, and anything Le Guin writes is good. I guess Harry Potter put me off most it, so I don't even look for it.

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Postby Robspierre » 07 Dec 2008 21:25

Try Scott Westerfeld, very science fiction oriented, Little Brother by Cory Doctorow rocks, Sara Ryan and Holly Black are good. Avoid the Twilight books, very poor writing. You do have to wade through some crap, Gossip Girl for example, love the show but the the books are vapid and even more shallow, but I've found on the average the YA offerings are more satisfying right now than the adult published material.

Rob

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Postby Omphalos » 08 Dec 2008 12:25

Are you talking about Westerfeld's Beauties series? Is that SF?

John C. Wright is supposed to have a winner with his YA fantasy stuff. I personally thought his SF was way, way too complicated, but I liked his short story about the royal court in space. Think it was called Guest Law or something like that.

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Postby Lisan Al-Gaib » 08 Dec 2008 12:38

Mandy wrote:I guess Harry Potter put me off most it, so I don't even look for it.


Sorry, mandy, But I think you are wrong.

I finished reading today the seventh book (Deadly Hallows) and the Harry potter series proved to be one of the best series I ever read (it will never beat my love for Dune, of course). I think there is too much prejudice over Harry potter because of the horrible movies and its fame.

After all these years following the series, I think Harry Potter will always have its prize in the YA literature.
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Postby DuneFishUK » 08 Dec 2008 14:41

Lisan Al-Gaib wrote:
Mandy wrote:I guess Harry Potter put me off most it, so I don't even look for it.


Sorry, mandy, But I think you are wrong.

I finished reading today the seventh book (Deadly Hallows) and the Harry potter series proved to be one of the best series I ever read (it will never beat my love for Dune, of course). I think there is too much prejudice over Harry potter because of the horrible movies and its fame.

After all these years following the series, I think Harry Potter will always have its prize in the YA literature.


It does sound like the potter series improves as it progresses - hell Goblet of Fire (IIRC) won a Hugo Award :shock: I only tried to read the first one - which I thought was terrible... and the first film is a contender for my worst film ever, as is the second one. After that, the films are actually pretty watchable - and sometimes quite good.

The only "YA" books I'm aware of reading are Heinlein's juveniles :)

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Postby Mandy » 08 Dec 2008 15:38

I thought the Harry Potter series got worse as it progressed. I only made it though the first 4, before giving up. You have to understand, though, I'm old, the teen angst stuff doesn't appeal to me.

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Postby Seraphan » 08 Dec 2008 17:01

DuneFishUK wrote:
Lisan Al-Gaib wrote:
Mandy wrote:I guess Harry Potter put me off most it, so I don't even look for it.


Sorry, mandy, But I think you are wrong.

I finished reading today the seventh book (Deadly Hallows) and the Harry potter series proved to be one of the best series I ever read (it will never beat my love for Dune, of course). I think there is too much prejudice over Harry potter because of the horrible movies and its fame.

After all these years following the series, I think Harry Potter will always have its prize in the YA literature.


It does sound like the potter series improves as it progresses - hell Goblet of Fire (IIRC) won a Hugo Award :shock: I only tried to read the first one - which I thought was terrible... and the first film is a contender for my worst film ever, as is the second one. After that, the films are actually pretty watchable - and sometimes quite good.

The only "YA" books I'm aware of reading are Heinlein's juveniles :)

Whoa whoa whoa! The forth one won a Hugo?! Are you serious?! I read it when i was younger and soon after i couldnt remeber 15% of it.
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