Norman Spinrad Interview

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JustSomeGuy
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Re: Norman Spinrad Interview

Postby JustSomeGuy » 21 Jul 2011 14:51

I just read through this thread for the first time. Nice!

SR: Now that Brian and Anderson's new book "Paul of Dune" is set in between DUNE and DUNE MESSIAH, not just a sequel or a prequel, but an "interquel" if you will, do you think Frank Herbert's Dune Legacy is in danger ? Will these new books "devalue" the DUNE trademark and so taint Frank's literary Legacy ?

NS: Who knows? In the long run, it depends on the critics, readers, and publishers. One thing Brian and Kevin can't ever do is put the byline "by Frank Herbert" on their stuff. That "Dune" is now a trademark I find disgusting, and the more it is devalued, the better. That trademark has little or nothing to do with Frank Herbert's literary legacy.
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dunaddict
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Re: Norman Spinrad Interview

Postby dunaddict » 01 Jul 2012 13:47

JustSomeGuy wrote:One thing Brian and Kevin can't ever do is put the byline "by Frank Herbert" on their stuff.

Except here in the Netherlands...; Lower left corner. ("Jagers van Duin" = "Hunters of Dune") :roll:

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gurensan
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Re: Norman Spinrad Interview

Postby gurensan » 09 Jul 2012 23:31

dunaddict wrote:
JustSomeGuy wrote:One thing Brian and Kevin can't ever do is put the byline "by Frank Herbert" on their stuff.

Except here in the Netherlands...; Lower left corner. ("Jagers van Duin" = "Hunters of Dune") :roll:

PICTURE HERE!


Ohhhhhhh the horror.
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Naïve mind
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Re: Norman Spinrad Interview

Postby Naïve mind » 06 Apr 2013 15:47

A very belated thanks for this interview, SandRider

Frybread
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Re: Norman Spinrad Interview

Postby Frybread » 06 Aug 2016 14:29

Seven years later and I still enjoy reading this interview from time to time!

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Re: Norman Spinrad Interview

Postby SandRider » 24 Sep 2016 23:48

It was the high-point of my personal Jihad. I'd never done anything like that before. It WAS pretty cool. :)
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Cpt. Aramsham
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Re: Norman Spinrad Interview

Postby Cpt. Aramsham » 06 Sep 2019 04:34

Norman Spinrad via SandRider wrote:NS: Knowing Frank's political philosophy, I once asked him how he could keep writing this royalist stuff. He told me he planned to end the series with a novel that would transition to a fictional universe of democratic rule.

I've always been a little skeptical of this statement, but I just came across corroboration in an interview with Frank Herbert himself that I'd never noticed before:

Frank Herbert wrote:Now I'll tell you something interesting in MY reading of history: Every time we have pulled the lid off the human desire to govern our own affairs, to be free of government, we've had a renaissance of some kind. We've had a social renaissance, we've had a political renaissance, an artistic renaissance. Every time in history we've unleashed this, we've gone forward by leaps and bounds. So I'm saying, "All right, this is what history says to me. So why don't we do it again?" That's what I'm playing with in the seventh Dune book: moving toward showing the kind of governments that finally evolve out of the situation I have created.

Though it sounds like what he was envisioning was less "democratic rule" and more a kind of libertarian/anarchist utopia.
Last edited by Cpt. Aramsham on 09 Sep 2019 03:35, edited 1 time in total.

georgiedenbro
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Re: Norman Spinrad Interview

Postby georgiedenbro » 06 Sep 2019 10:04

Cpt. Aramsham wrote:
Frank Herbert wrote:Now I'll tell you something interesting in MY reading of history: Every time we have pulled the lid off the human desire to govern our own affairs, to be free of government, we've had a renaissance of some kind. We've had a social renaissance, we've had a political renaissance, an artistic renaissance. Every time in history we've unleashed this, we've gone forward by leaps and bounds. So I'm saying, "All right, this is what history says to me. So why don't we do it again?" That's what I'm playing with in the seventh Dune book: moving toward showing the kind of governments that finally evolve out of the situation I have created.

Though it sounds like what he was envisioning was less "democractic rule" and more a kind of libertarian/anarchist utopia.


I would be quite suprised if the "democratic" government he was going to suggest is anything like what Western countries have now. But I would also be suprised if it was a government-free situation. It sounds like what he's saying here is that when people *think* they're done with government that's really when they're finally open to reforming it, but that the idea of actually having no overarching government won't happen (or can't work). It's especially tough to imagine Dune 7 was going to be a 'people rule themselves' scenario when you stop to think about the power of Siaynoq and later on the double-imprinting. I think the idea is that some force is needed to rule you, and that if it isn't a feudal despot then it's got to be something on a smaller scale but that controls you just as much. If we're going to look at this SAT-style, I would suggest that as Siaynoq is to Duncan/Murbella's imprinting, so would the feudal government's be to X, where X is the result in Dune 7. What exactly that might be is a question.
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lotek
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Re: Norman Spinrad Interview

Postby lotek » 07 Nov 2019 07:51

I always felt the way the Bene Gesserit ran Chapterhouse was what Frank had in mind.
Instead of acting after events to modify their outcome, you'd create a self sustaining system where each individual action is part of a whole.
Maybe not said like that, but hopefully you get the gist.
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