Home Schooling around the world

Image
    Abandon all sanity, ye who enter here!

Moderators: ᴶᵛᵀᴬ, Omphalos, Freakzilla

User avatar
Eyes High
Patience Personified
Posts: 2321
Joined: 22 Jul 2008 15:32
Location: between the worlds of men and make believe

Home Schooling around the world

Postby Eyes High » 16 Dec 2009 16:12

Okay, I know there are multiple sides to every story so I would like y'all's opinion on this one. Especially from those members in UK who know the people mention in this article:

http://www.hslda.org/hs/international/UnitedKingdom/200912100.asp

Here is a small excerpt from the article:


Criminal Background Checks Part of Draconian Law Proposed for Homeschoolers


A bill proposed by the British government and now making its way through parliament would impose the most burdensome and intrusive regulation on homeschooling in the English-speaking world.

“This bill is breathtaking in its scope and reflects a perverse level of suspicion towards parents who home-educate their children,” says HSLDA Staff Attorney and Director of International Relations Michael Donnelly. “If this bill were to pass, it would be the most restrictive and overbearing law in the English-speaking world. It places total discretion in the hands of local educational officials to determine whether or not they will ‘register’ a home education program and would require criminal background checks for parents before they could begin homeschooling their own children.”

The bill is the result of recommendations made by Graham Badman, whose report was released this past summer and later accepted by the current British government. Current British Prime Minister Gordon Brown recently dismissed homeschoolers’ concerns about the report. (Read HSLDA’s “Reply to the Badman Report.”)

Brown responded to a petition supported by thousands of British homeschoolers calling on their government to reject legislation based on the Badman Report. Brown said that the report and legislation were fine because, “[m]ost developed countries require registration to home educate, with the majority also having a process of systematic monitoring. It is only right we afford our own children and young people the same checks and balances.”1

Free to Homeschool
In reality, few developed countries require registration to homeschool. Neither the United States nor Canada, where the overwhelming majority of homeschoolers reside, require homeschoolers to register with the state. Rather, most North American governments have a system of notification where parents simply inform the authorities that they are homeschooling. “Registration” implies approval. However, no Canadian province and only two of the 50 American states require registration involving the formal approval of homeschools. And in these two states there are virtually no instances where homeschools are disapproved.

...


So what do you think, and is this report accurate?
What fear is there in the night?
Nothing, but that which is in our own imaginations.

User avatar
chanilover
Posts: 1639
Joined: 18 Feb 2008 08:29

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby chanilover » 16 Dec 2009 18:25

Nothing our clapped out state control freak government does surprises me anymore.
"You and your buddies and that b*tch Mandy are nothing but a gang of lying, socially maladjusted losers." - St Hypatia of Arrakeen.
Image
Image

User avatar
Omphalos
Inglorious Bastard
Posts: 6628
Joined: 05 Feb 2008 11:07
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California
Contact:

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby Omphalos » 16 Dec 2009 18:57

I believe that the children are our future, so I'm all for it.

User avatar
A Thing of Eternity
Posts: 6090
Joined: 08 Apr 2008 15:35
Location: Calgary Alberta

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby A Thing of Eternity » 16 Dec 2009 19:08

I think homeschooling probably should be more closely controlled, why are those kids any less important than others? And while many people do a great job homeschooling, it can still deprive kids of 90% of their social interaction. Plus, people shouldn't be in 100% control of what their kids learn, that's is how we end up with fanatics and people who don't know anything at all about the outside world.

Look at how Brian Herbert turned out, and he had FH as a teacher! :shock:
Image

User avatar
Omphalos
Inglorious Bastard
Posts: 6628
Joined: 05 Feb 2008 11:07
Location: The Mighty Central Valley of California
Contact:

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby Omphalos » 16 Dec 2009 19:55

A Thing of Eternity wrote:I think homeschooling probably should be more closely controlled, why are those kids any less important than others? And while many people do a great job homeschooling, it can still deprive kids of 90% of their social interaction. Plus, people shouldn't be in 100% control of what their kids learn, that's is how we end up with fanatics and people who don't know anything at all about the outside world.

Look at how Brian Herbert turned out, and he had FH as a teacher! :shock:


Frank may have tought a few classes, but I'm pretty sure his homeroom teacher was actually a bong.

User avatar
A Thing of Eternity
Posts: 6090
Joined: 08 Apr 2008 15:35
Location: Calgary Alberta

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby A Thing of Eternity » 16 Dec 2009 21:22

Omphalos wrote:
A Thing of Eternity wrote:I think homeschooling probably should be more closely controlled, why are those kids any less important than others? And while many people do a great job homeschooling, it can still deprive kids of 90% of their social interaction. Plus, people shouldn't be in 100% control of what their kids learn, that's is how we end up with fanatics and people who don't know anything at all about the outside world.

Look at how Brian Herbert turned out, and he had FH as a teacher! :shock:


Frank may have tought a few classes, but I'm pretty sure his homeroom teacher was actually a bong.


Nah, pot can't explain all the drain bramage, must have had a bottle of wisky as his TA, or a lot of acid "feild" trips.
Image

User avatar
Eyes High
Patience Personified
Posts: 2321
Joined: 22 Jul 2008 15:32
Location: between the worlds of men and make believe

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby Eyes High » 16 Dec 2009 21:54

A Thing of Eternity wrote:I think homeschooling probably should be more closely controlled, why are those kids any less important than others? And while many people do a great job homeschooling, it can still deprive kids of 90% of their social interaction. Plus, people shouldn't be in 100% control of what their kids learn, that's is how we end up with fanatics and people who don't know anything at all about the outside world.

Look at how Brian Herbert turned out, and he had FH as a teacher! :shock:



But I bet a lot of fanatics went to either public or private school. I'm sure there are extremists that come from all forms of educational environments. My question would be what right does the government have to tell me how I may teach my own children and why should there be more regulations placed on the parents of home schooled children than on the parents who send their kids to private schools?

And as far as social interaction I think that is not as valid an argument as it use to be. My niece and nephew go to public school and they have very few chances to actually interact with their classmates. They are not allowed to talk during class nor at lunch time. (which is silly to me) So that leaves recess (15 mins) and the bus ride. But sometimes they are not allowed to talk on the bus either so there goes that interaction. School is not how it use to be. Here is another report...a bias one I know but still sound I think.
http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/washingtontimes/200912140.asp

Excerpt from above article:

Washington Times Op-ed—Socialization not a Problem


by J. Michael Smith
HSLDA President

One of the most persistent criticisms of homeschooling is the accusation that homeschoolers will not be able to fully participate in society because they lack “socialization.” It’s a challenge that reaches right to the heart of homeschooling, because if a child isn’t properly socialized, how will that child be able to contribute to society?

Since the re-emergence of the homeschool movement in the late 1970s, critics of homeschooling have perpetuated two myths. The first concerns the ability of parents to adequately teach their own children at home; the second is whether homeschooled children will be well-adjusted socially.

Proving academic success is relatively straightforward. Today, it is accepted that homeschoolers, on average, outperform their public school peers. The most recent study, “Homeschool Progress Report 2009,” conducted by Brian Ray of the National Home Education Research Institute, surveyed more than 11,000 homeschooled students. It showed that the average homeschooler scored 37 percentile points higher on standardized achievement tests than the public school average.

The second myth, however, is more difficult to address because children who were homeschooled in appreciable numbers in the late 1980s and early 1990s are only now coming of age and in a position to demonstrate they can succeed as adults.

Homeschool families across the nation knew criticisms about adequate socialization were ill-founded—they had the evidence right in their own homes. In part to address this question from a research perspective, the Home School Legal Defense Association commissioned a study in 2003 titled “Homeschooling Grows Up,” conducted by Mr. Ray, to discover how homeschoolers were faring as adults. The news was good for homeschooling. In all areas of life, from gaining employment, to being satisfied with their homeschooling, to participating in community activities, to voting, homeschoolers were more active and involved than their public school counterparts.

...


Thank you for the opinions . Please keep them coming?
What fear is there in the night?
Nothing, but that which is in our own imaginations.

User avatar
A Thing of Eternity
Posts: 6090
Joined: 08 Apr 2008 15:35
Location: Calgary Alberta

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby A Thing of Eternity » 17 Dec 2009 02:33

Eyes High wrote:
A Thing of Eternity wrote:I think homeschooling probably should be more closely controlled, why are those kids any less important than others? And while many people do a great job homeschooling, it can still deprive kids of 90% of their social interaction. Plus, people shouldn't be in 100% control of what their kids learn, that's is how we end up with fanatics and people who don't know anything at all about the outside world.

Look at how Brian Herbert turned out, and he had FH as a teacher! :shock:



But I bet a lot of fanatics went to either public or private school. I'm sure there are extremists that come from all forms of educational environments. My question would be what right does the government have to tell me how I may teach my own children and why should there be more regulations placed on the parents of home schooled children than on the parents who send their kids to private schools?


I'm not trying to say at all that more nutcases and fanatics come from homeschooling, most certainly come from public. What I mean is that the potential to warp your child (think hate groups, religious extremism like the morman reserves (or whatever they're called)) is vastly upped by having the power to take away proper education.

I think society 100% has the right to tell people what to teach their own kids. Parents do not own their children, and society has the right to make sure children are not abused - giving someone a crap/false education is abuse, and should be prevented just as much as sexual or violent abuse. We already enforce that belief in our public schools. The key is that society can't tell parents what NOT to teach their kids. If someone wants to teach their kids that the earth is 6 thousand years old, thats fine, but they should not be allowed to hide the fact that mainsteam science says otherwise. If they want to tell their kids the halocaust never happened, fine, but they shouldn't be allowed to block out the fact that 99.99999% of the world dissagrees with that.

Exteme examples, but I think they illustrate my point. I don't want to limit anyone's right to say/teach whatever they want - I want the opposite of that, I want to make sure that kids aren't denied proper education, which is as much as a sentence to poverty and ignorance.

And as far as social interaction I think that is not as valid an argument as it use to be. My niece and nephew go to public school and they have very few chances to actually interact with their classmates. They are not allowed to talk during class nor at lunch time. (which is silly to me) So that leaves recess (15 mins) and the bus ride. But sometimes they are not allowed to talk on the bus either so there goes that interaction. School is not how it use to be. Here is another report...a bias one I know but still sound I think.


Fair enough, but I would think that a lot of extra activities would be needed to make up for even that minimal interaction, and I think that example you give is probably an extreme case (I've never heard of any public school like that).
Image

User avatar
SandChigger
KJASF Ground Zero
Posts: 14490
Joined: 08 Feb 2008 22:29
Location: "Whatcha having, shoog? Hurry up and order now, I ain't got all day!"
Contact:

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby SandChigger » 17 Dec 2009 03:05

I'm opposed to homeschooling in principle unless there is some form of severe disability involved.

Wingnut parents not counting as one of those forms. ;)

User avatar
lotek
Posts: 5735
Joined: 28 Jul 2009 08:33

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby lotek » 17 Dec 2009 05:49

“[m]ost developed countries require registration to home educate, with the majority also having a process of systematic monitoring. It is only right we afford our own children and young people the same checks and balances.”1

but
In reality, few developed countries require registration to homeschool. Neither the United States nor Canada, where the overwhelming majority of homeschoolers reside, require homeschoolers to register with the state.


lies lies lies...
Spice is the worm's gonads.

User avatar
Eyes High
Patience Personified
Posts: 2321
Joined: 22 Jul 2008 15:32
Location: between the worlds of men and make believe

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby Eyes High » 17 Dec 2009 11:13

A Thing of Eternity wrote:...
I'm not trying to say at all that more nutcases and fanatics come from homeschooling, most certainly come from public. What I mean is that the potential to warp your child (think hate groups, religious extremism like the morman reserves (or whatever they're called)) is vastly upped by having the power to take away proper education.

...


Oh, I didn't think you were saying that, although I do believe there are those out there who wholeheartedly believes that.

A Thing of Eternity wrote:Fair enough, but I would think that a lot of extra activities would be needed to make up for even that minimal interaction, and I think that example you give is probably an extreme case (I've never heard of any public school like that).



Schools are changing...some changes are good, some are not. (IMO) It seems like there are SOME teachers who expect the kids to sit still and quiet for 6 hours and we know that that is hard for some adults to do, much less kids full of energy.


I do feel like there is good and bad in all types of educational environments and that one form is not necessarily better than the other. I do agree with you up to a point that there are those who use homeschooling to further their hate, but most homeschoolers, I believe, have chosen that path so that they can give their kids chances that overtaxed public schools are unable to give them at that point in time.
What fear is there in the night?
Nothing, but that which is in our own imaginations.

loremaster
Posts: 220
Joined: 18 Feb 2008 04:24
Location: Leicester
Contact:

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby loremaster » 17 Dec 2009 11:22

Whooo boy, isnt this a veritable snake-pit.

Firstly, if i say anything which offends you, (likely) i ask that you remember this is only my opinion. Secondly, i ask you whether the reason you're getting prickly about the points i make is because you might, in part, concede i have a valid point of view.

I have taught now as a fully qualified teacher in two english schools, and several more during placement and training. I currently teach at [edit - thought i'd better remove my college, just in case] England. Science and Maths. and tutor GCSE mathematics, A level Biologists and Chemists privately.

Pupil and Parent empowerment is the single biggest crippling factor in english state education today. Parental involvement invariably means parents with one particular experience extrapolating and applying it to all involved, usually aggressively. This applies almost wherever they interfere in school life and policy.

The arrogance of parents in particular offends me. By what rights do you claim equality with me? If i walked into a mechanics and started suggesting alternative repairs, some might be acceptable, most of my suggestions would doubtless be rubbish. I expect the same if i walked into a Bank, Professional Kitchen, etc etc. So why do all parents instinctively feel qualified and entitled to criticise and believe they know better? I have a basic knowledge of cars, money and cooking, yet don't critique these people unfairly. I toddle where they stride, and the same should be applied to me. A little respect.

So why, by sheer virtue of being able to pop out a child, do you become capable of teaching students to the same standard as the level which i have spent four years of university study, two of professional training and two years experience to teach. How do you become capable of doing that to ALL subjects you teach?

Where do you get the resources to comprehensively teach science, or mathematics, or english? How are you qualified to select which parts of our CONTINUALLY assessed, reviewed and improved curriculum (both nationally and within my department) are appropriate to your child?

The arrogance and misplaced confidence is astounding. In my experience most home educators and educatees have narrow skills bases, miss fundamental parts of education, and miss out on all the extra learning which takes place in schools. Social skills, the rigours of discipline, habit and work ethic (now often sadly neglected by many educators in and outside of school).

Futhermore, in my experience, home education is often chosen by students/parents who are previously seen to have "failed" at conventional schools (only AFTERWARDS, never before starting primary education). Failure within state schools is not an option, if you truly knew the funding and resources thrown at the bottom 5% of students and those deemed failing, you would weep. 80% of the education budget to support the bottom 10% of students is a figure i hear banded around often. When you consider the need for ed pschs, TA's, Learning mentors, Autism support teams etc, i can believe it too. Choosing home education suggests to me a degree of "denial" about a childs root problems.

Most parents who choose home schooling after a period of "failure" in state schools are, in my opinion, in a state of denial about the current requirements of their own offspring. Certainly, to think you can provide a better or more comprehensive education than a team of well educated, resourced and organised professionals is beyond me. You might have experience of hospitals, but that doesnt mean you'd perform your own child's appendectomy, does it?
Last edited by loremaster on 17 Dec 2009 11:25, edited 1 time in total.
The HLP hasnt released Frank's notes yet, Brian hasn't got the handwriting quite right!

loremaster
Posts: 220
Joined: 18 Feb 2008 04:24
Location: Leicester
Contact:

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby loremaster » 17 Dec 2009 11:24

and i second everything Thing said too. It's about fair, accurate and open education.

I get on my same high horse about creationists too.
The HLP hasnt released Frank's notes yet, Brian hasn't got the handwriting quite right!

User avatar
A Thing of Eternity
Posts: 6090
Joined: 08 Apr 2008 15:35
Location: Calgary Alberta

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby A Thing of Eternity » 17 Dec 2009 12:18

Tell us how you really feel!

I get what you're saying, I don't tell my doctor how to do his/job, though I might get a second opinion if I suspect incompetance. I've seen all kinds of things where parents essentially ignored teachers warnings about their kids, and instance that they new what was best for their kid's education.

I think at the very least a parent should have to demonstrate some working knowledge of all the subjects, they can't honestly expect to just read stuff like highschool physics texts and make sense of it (most high school science texts are so dumbed down that they actually don't make any sense whatsoever until you read university level texts).
Image

User avatar
Eyes High
Patience Personified
Posts: 2321
Joined: 22 Jul 2008 15:32
Location: between the worlds of men and make believe

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby Eyes High » 18 Dec 2009 16:15

loremaster wrote:Whooo boy, isnt this a veritable snake-pit.

Firstly, if i say anything which offends you, (likely) i ask that you remember this is only my opinion. Secondly, i ask you whether the reason you're getting prickly about the points i make is because you might, in part, concede i have a valid point of view.



Whoaa. First off, if I have said anything to offend you or anyone else, then I ask that you except my sincere apology. It is not my intent to offend and I have not been offended.

Second, let me assure you that I do have a high respect for those who have chosen the challenging career of teaching. I realized a long time ago that I would not have the patience required to put up with the BS that some students give their teachers.

Personally I would not walk into a classroom and try to tell the teacher how to instruct their students, I have not been trained in the art of teaching multiple kids. However, I do feel that most parents know their own children better than the teacher who has 20+ kids to worry about knows that child.

As a teacher I believe that you would agree with me that not all children have the same learning pattern. Some are auditory learners, some are kinetic …. Well you know the terminology, but all kids do not learn the same. Teachers, at least the ones that I have had the pleasure (and in two cases the displeasure) of knowing, have to teach to the majority not the individual.


I don’t know how it is in the schools in which you ply your profession, but the teachers I know are overtaxed and underpaid. Several find their hands tied by senseless paperwork and regulations. And they are not referring to the grades but one teacher who is my friend said she had to attend a class on the new paperwork for taking class attendance…Whatever happened to just putting a check in the roll book beside the student’s name?

Now I do whole-heartedly agree with you to a point that home schooling is not for everybody and that it is not a magic solution and should not be entered into lightly. But I didn’t realize I was getting prickly. Once again I apologize if I did not word my earlier responses correctly so that they would seem neutral and unbiased.

The part I admit I do get ‘prickly’ over is the argument about socializing for I think that the kids today don’t get as much of that in the public schools as they use to and to claim that as a disadvantage for homeschoolers seems unfair. To me it seems like a homeschooler would be able to socialize more and with a wider range of people, not just kids their own age but with kids of other ages and adults of all ages as well.


[quote=“loremaster”] Most parents who choose home schooling after a period of "failure" in state schools are, in my opinion, in a state of denial about the current requirements of their own offspring. Certainly, to think you can provide a better or more comprehensive education than a team of well educated, resourced and organised professionals is beyond me. You might have experience of hospitals, but that doesnt mean you'd perform your own child's appendectomy, does it? [/quote]

You are right in that most school systems have resources that the average parents do not; however, I think there are resources out there that homeschoolers can avail themselves with. For example, I cannot teach a foreign language, but there is a community college that holds courses in our county. And even after I started home schooling my child I continued to take him to speech therapy at his formal school and then at the middle school when he entered the sixth grade. I think most parents would accept outside help when needed.

Once again, forgive me if it seemed like I was attacking the teaching profession. I have no trouble with most teachers, like any profession there are a few bad ones out there but most teachers do their job because they love the kids and want them to learn. My ‘beef’ is with politics that tie the teachers hands and allow some kids to slip through the cracks. It is those kids whom the school system have failed that might benefit from home schooling.

I begin teaching my middle child because he was a class clown and the teacher did not have the time to devote to him with 30 other kids in her class. And I felt it was unfair to her to have to put up with the disruption. We punished him for disrupting the class but he continued. It wasn’t bad behavior, he just kept telling jokes and making funny faces. Yet he would pass every test. He was bored and I was able to give him the one on one attention he needed at that time. My oldest son saw what his little brother was learning and asked to be home schooled. This surprised me because he would have been starting high school that year. I was scared and nervous but did so. I have asked my son if he regretted it and he keeps assuring me that he did not. More than likely I will try to get my youngest son enrolled into the early college program when he reaches ninth grade. I think the main point that I hold a friendly disagreement with you on it the assumption that just because a parent is not formally train automatically disqualifies them from teaching their own child.

I believe that most home schooling parents acknowledge the areas they are week in and seek additional help in those areas. I least I do. Which I also admit that I was lucky in the case of my middle son, he has a thirst for knowledge which leads him to search for more things to learn. That is why he was such a class clown in first, second, and third grade. He was simply bored and needed more challenges. But that is also why I admit that with my youngest son that by the time he gets to high school, I more than likely will not be able to continue his teaching because of the advancements in the educational field and his learning type.

Home schooling is a hot topic. I realize that not everyone will agree on it. I don’t believe it is child abuse as some people claim, but will admit that those who abuse their children could use it as a mean to continue doing so with less chance of getting caught. But all homeschoolers should not be punished because of a few idiots. Like I said at the start of this thread, I want’ to know what y’all thought and I wanted to know if the excepts were true as to the claim of what the UK was planning on doing. Why do back ground checks on Homeschoolers when other parents where not having back ground checks preformed on them?

I disagree that the state has a 100% right to tell me how to raise my kids…I was the one who gave birth to them, who feeds and clothe them, who provides a place for them to stay. Even if they were still going to public school the state would not have the right to tell me how to raise them.

I do agree that a wise parent will allow their children to learn about many different things. Yeah, teach them your belief but also allow them to know there are other beliefs out there. Explain why you believe what you believe and allow them to make up their own mind.

Wow..I’m rambling aren’t I?


Sorry. I’ll stop for now.. Just please allow me to say once again…that I respect my fellow Jacurutuns, even if I disagree with them I still respect them and their opinions.
What fear is there in the night?
Nothing, but that which is in our own imaginations.

User avatar
A Thing of Eternity
Posts: 6090
Joined: 08 Apr 2008 15:35
Location: Calgary Alberta

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby A Thing of Eternity » 18 Dec 2009 16:38

You make some good points, but maybe I missed something in the original post, isn't this disscussion about more closely regulating the cirriculum of homeschooled students? That doesn't seem like a bad idea to me, I would think that if children aren't allowed to drop out before age 16 then they should be expected to be taught the accepted cirriculum regardless of where they are learning, at least until age 16. I don't think we should tell people whether or not they can homeschool their children, but there should be some control over what is being taught.

Or was this about something else? I'm a little turned around now.
Image

User avatar
Eyes High
Patience Personified
Posts: 2321
Joined: 22 Jul 2008 15:32
Location: between the worlds of men and make believe

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby Eyes High » 18 Dec 2009 17:41

The confusion might be mine. I was seeing the thing about a background check and I think that might have befuddled the rest of the report for me.

I agree that children should be taught the basics...Reading, proper Grammar in their own language, Math, Spelling, Science, History (both world and local) Social Studies, and of course some electives like Art, Music appreciation, and so forth.

I know in my state my kids take a test every year and I have to send in the result to the Department of nonpublic education. I use the CAT (California Achievement Test) which I rent from a company and the send it back for the company to grade them. The company then sends me the report, I make a copy of the results and the attendance record, and send those copies off to the state. But no one comes in and tells me I have to teach science from this book or this curriculum. I think that should be left up to the parents. Yes I teach my kids that I believe the world was created, but we still study the other theories and what scientist have said through out the ages and how things have changed as mankind grew in wisdom and knowledge. i.e. flat earth v/s sphere. Six thousand years old v/s millions or billions of years old. (and yes, I believe we (the Earth and universe) have been here much longer than six thousand years.

As long as parents can show their kids are learning the fundamentals why should someone be allowed to tell them what curriculum they may or may not use. I don't even like other homeschoolers who try to tell others they are bad parents/teachers for not using such and such curriculum.

I know I'm strange and weird, not the 'normal' Christian, I tend to not follow blindly the teachings laid before me. However, I do feel that as long as a parent is taking care of their child(ren) no one has the right to tell them how to raise them. What happened to innocent until proven guilty? Trust the parents with their own child unless that parent has proven that he/she does not have their child's best interest at heart.
What fear is there in the night?
Nothing, but that which is in our own imaginations.

User avatar
trang
Posts: 1223
Joined: 06 May 2008 18:59
Location: Hot Tub Time Machine
Contact:

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby trang » 19 Dec 2009 19:09

I believe the corps question about whether the "state" should do background checks for parents who home school is over the top and out of focus. The public school systems here (cant speak for other western countries) do a mediocre job at best. Private schools somewhat better, but nothing stellar.

The facts are that the "state" should focus on fixing the system that is broken, rather than one that isnt. Home school kids achieve, on average well and above, the public school kids. The statistics are out there, just have to look.

Most home school families are part of an association of home schoolers, or participate in extra curricular activities with the district they live in. I have known quite a few parents who home school and they're kids are well adjusted, mannered, disciplined, extroverted, and very sociable.

I think kids in public school do ok as a rule of thumb, I am a product of public school myself, but it could be much better.

I think the "state" should focus on paying teachers more, funding for facilities, more QA on education, funding for advanced education, etc. These are areas that are in desperate need of efficient and effective management, streamlining and correcting.

Homeschooling isnt perfect, nothing education wise is, but its very good options for parents, and like most, if they follow thru, its a good or better experience than standard options.

Go home schoolers!!! More Power to ya!!
"Long Live the Fighters", "Dragon.....the other white meat."

Image

User avatar
A Thing of Eternity
Posts: 6090
Joined: 08 Apr 2008 15:35
Location: Calgary Alberta

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby A Thing of Eternity » 21 Dec 2009 18:07

trang wrote:I think the "state" should focus on paying teachers more, funding for facilities, more QA on education, funding for advanced education, etc. These are areas that are in desperate need of efficient and effective management, streamlining and correcting.


I'd agree with that, I don't know how bad it's gotten down south, but our public system up here could use some much needed funding and reform. Unfortunately our political parties would rather buy votes with refund cheques and tax breaks than admit that they need the money and spend it on improving our countries future....
Image

User avatar
Eyes High
Patience Personified
Posts: 2321
Joined: 22 Jul 2008 15:32
Location: between the worlds of men and make believe

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby Eyes High » 21 Dec 2009 19:53

A Thing of Eternity wrote:
trang wrote:I think the "state" should focus on paying teachers more, funding for facilities, more QA on education, funding for advanced education, etc. These are areas that are in desperate need of efficient and effective management, streamlining and correcting.


I'd agree with that, I don't know how bad it's gotten down south, but our public system up here could use some much needed funding and reform. Unfortunately our political parties would rather buy votes with refund cheques and tax breaks than admit that they need the money and spend it on improving our countries future....



I totally agree. Instead of cutting funding and teachers' pay, they need to invest in the education system. And do it wisely.
What fear is there in the night?
Nothing, but that which is in our own imaginations.

User avatar
Freakzilla
Lead Singer and Driver of the Winnebego
Posts: 18160
Joined: 05 Feb 2008 01:27
Location: Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Contact:

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby Freakzilla » 28 Dec 2009 08:56

Public schools in the south can vary wildly depending on the location and demographics. Rural (suburban) schools with a low percentage of minorities are good to excellent. While inner city schools (I'm not sure how many "inner-city" areas there are in the South) can be plain warzones. Experienced teachers tend to gravitate towards schools where they won't get shot or stabbed.

Who can blame them?
Image
Paul of Dune was so bad it gave me a seizure that dislocated both of my shoulders and prolapsed my anus.
~Pink Snowman

User avatar
Serkanner
Posts: 2830
Joined: 17 Feb 2008 18:44
Location: Den Haag - The Netherlands

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby Serkanner » 06 Jan 2010 16:31

Interesting find:

HERBERT: First of all, my childhood days gave me some rockribbed ideas about the ways people should live together. To put my beliefs simply: I think we ought to be loyal to our friends . . . we ought to be truthful . . . we ought to be supportive of family members . . . and we ought to provide one another with help directly instead of delegating our good deeds to institutions.

I don't like governmental "helping"—or any kind of public charity system-because I learned early on that our society's institutions often weaken people's self-reliance and damage family bonds as well. Take education, for instance. The teaching of our young ought to be about equally divided between the family, which should lay the ground-work for the child's learning, and professionals who can pass on useful knowledge that the child's relatives might not have in their repertoire. Today, though, the professional education establishment assumes that the family doesn't know what its own members need or want. The result is a classic failure . . . an institutionalized system that does more harm than good.

Do you know that—in response to just that problem—my own family left the United States twice? On both occasions we went to live in Mexico . . . because I was not considered "qualified" to teach my children in the U.S., but could home-school them in Mexico. Our youngsters were taught at home when they were young, and they haven't suffered in the least from it.

source: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Nature-C ... spx?page=3
"... the mystery of life isn't a problem to solve but a reality to experience."

“There is no escape—we pay for the violence of our ancestors.”

Sandrider: "Keith went to Bobo's for a weekend of drinking, watched some DVDs,
and wrote a Dune Novel."

User avatar
A Thing of Eternity
Posts: 6090
Joined: 08 Apr 2008 15:35
Location: Calgary Alberta

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby A Thing of Eternity » 06 Jan 2010 16:38

Yeah, well... he had some pretty good ideas about most things... can't be right about everything I guess!
Image

User avatar
Serkanner
Posts: 2830
Joined: 17 Feb 2008 18:44
Location: Den Haag - The Netherlands

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby Serkanner » 06 Jan 2010 16:46

A Thing of Eternity wrote:Yeah, well... he had some pretty good ideas about most things... can't be right about everything I guess!


No, one can not. There are quite a lot of opinions Frank had I don't agree with, but that doesn't make me change my opinion about his writing. I also like Lovecraft ... and he and I differ far more on a lot of issues.

It is actually sad to see how number one and especially number two son turned out to be with a father as talented as Frank.
"... the mystery of life isn't a problem to solve but a reality to experience."

“There is no escape—we pay for the violence of our ancestors.”

Sandrider: "Keith went to Bobo's for a weekend of drinking, watched some DVDs,
and wrote a Dune Novel."

User avatar
A Thing of Eternity
Posts: 6090
Joined: 08 Apr 2008 15:35
Location: Calgary Alberta

Re: Home Schooling around the world

Postby A Thing of Eternity » 06 Jan 2010 16:51

Serkanner wrote:
A Thing of Eternity wrote:Yeah, well... he had some pretty good ideas about most things... can't be right about everything I guess!

No, one can not. There are quite a lot of opinions Frank had I don't agree with, but that doesn't make me change my opinion about his writing. I also like Lovecraft ... and he and I differ far more on a lot of issues.
It is actually sad to see how number one and especially number two son turned out to be with a father as talented as Frank.


Number 1 probably would have turned out fine if it wasn't for the homophobic world he grew up in. Adding to the idiocy of son #2 though, I once read an interview where he blamed his brother's drug and alcohol abuse, along with his homosexuality, on FH's shitty parenting. What an idiot, he actually thinks his brother was "experimenting with homosexuality" like it's some new drink that everyone wants to try. Idiot.
Image


Return to “˱”