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    Peak Oil

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    Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 06 Apr 2011 15:26

    awright, then ...
    can o' worms ... check ...
    can opener ... check ...


    I just may be in the process of changing one of my MAJOR world-views ...

    {this ain't easy for me at all, and despite my apparent radical-nature, for
    the most part, I like to wait awhile for some more data to roll in afore I
    go off half-cocked ... this wasn't always the way I was, but sometime
    during the Reagan Era (1976-1991) I finally started to understand just
    how good the global governments and Robber Barons were at double &
    triple dis-information ...}

    also, I sometimes forget how quickly time passes by; if you don't keep up
    with new developments, new theories, and the test of Reality on old
    theories, you end up sounding like my daddy arguing against Evolution
    using examples from the Scopes Monkey Trial ...

    after having my ear talked off this spring around fire-rings about "Peak
    Oil", and fitting all that together with some goddamn strange and out-
    of-character statements I've personally heard from folks I know out on
    the Permian Basin, I've found myself standing on the threshold ...

    my basis for ignoring and discounting (without researching) the Peak
    Oil Theory was from discussions and bullshitting with geologists and
    roughnecks in the Middle East in the late 1970s & 80s ... bolstered
    by some (apparent) dis-information about the net-energy cost of things
    like the Alberta oil sands, the new off-shore deep-water rigs, and
    actual consumption versus production figures ...

    I've been really impressed with the group of thinkers we have assembled here ...
    the core group has always been thoughtful and open-minded, willing to do a
    little more research than watching a few minutes of franchised news channels
    and parroting those opinions, and willing to actually study and think about
    issues, and admit to a change of opinion if the facts warrant ...

    {also, the demographics of this group is impressive to me: we have college
    educated professionals, high-school drop-outs, a variety of "nationalities",
    cops, hippies, anarchists, atheists, Believers, societal mis-fits and pillars
    of communities ... conspiracy theorists & debunkers, and quite a few social
    conservatives, altho the general leanings of the board are more liberal ...}

    so Imma toss out some quotes & links & stuff ...
    because, from where I stand, I think this may be the most important issue
    on the table right now ... and goddamnit, we gotta have some fucking
    truth here ...
    ................ I exist only to amuse myself ................
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    I personally feel that this message board, Jacurutu, is full of hateful folks who don't know
    how to fully interact with people.
    ~ "Spice Grandson" (Bryon Merrit) 08 June 2008
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 06 Apr 2011 15:28

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peak_oil

    Peak oil is the point in time when the maximum rate of global petroleum extraction is reached, after which the rate of production enters terminal decline. This concept is based on the observed production rates of individual oil wells, and the combined production rate of a field of related oil wells. The aggregate production rate from an oil field over time usually grows exponentially until the rate peaks and then declines—sometimes rapidly—until the field is depleted. This concept is derived from the Hubbert curve, and has been shown to be applicable to the sum of a nation’s domestic production rate, and is similarly applied to the global rate of petroleum production. Peak oil is often confused with oil depletion; peak oil is the point of maximum production while depletion refers to a period of falling reserves and supply.

    M. King Hubbert created and first used the models behind peak oil in 1956 to accurately predict that United States oil production would peak between 1965 and 1970.[1] His logistic model, now called Hubbert peak theory, and its variants have described with reasonable accuracy the peak and decline of production from oil wells, fields, regions, and countries,[2] and has also proved useful in other limited-resource production-domains. According to the Hubbert model, the production rate of a limited resource will follow a roughly symmetrical logistic distribution curve (sometimes incorrectly compared to a bell-shaped curve) based on the limits of exploitability and market pressures.

    Some observers, such as petroleum industry experts Kenneth S. Deffeyes and Matthew Simmons, believe the high dependence of most modern industrial transport, agricultural, and industrial systems on the relative low cost and high availability of oil will cause the post-peak production decline and possible severe increases in the price of oil to have negative implications for the global economy. Predictions vary greatly as to what exactly these negative effects would be. If political and economic changes only occur in reaction to high prices and shortages rather than in reaction to the threat of a peak, then the degree of economic damage to importing countries will largely depend on how rapidly oil imports decline post-peak.

    Optimistic estimations of peak production forecast the global decline will begin by 2020 or later, and assume major investments in alternatives will occur before a crisis, without requiring major changes in the lifestyle of heavily oil-consuming nations. These models show the price of oil at first escalating and then retreating as other types of fuel and energy sources are used.[3] Pessimistic predictions of future oil production operate on the thesis that either the peak has already occurred,[4][5][6][7] that oil production is on the cusp of the peak, or that it will occur shortly.[8][9] The International Energy Agency (IEA) says production of conventional crude oil peaked in 2006.[10][11] Throughout the first two quarters of 2008, there were signs that a global recession was being made worse by a series of record oil prices.[12]


    NOTE: these people have "survival guides" for sale ....

    http://www.oildecline.com/

    It has taken between 50-300 million years to form, and yet we have managed to burn roughly half of all global oil reserves in merely 125 years or so.

    The world now consumes 85 million barrels of oil per day, or 40,000 gallons per second, and demand is growing exponentially.

    Oil production in 33 out of 48 out countries has now peaked, including Kuwait, Russia and Mexico. Global oil production is now also approaching an all time peak and can potentially end our Industrial Civilization. The most distinguished and prominent geologists, oil industry experts, energy analysts and organizations all agree that big trouble is brewing.

    The world is not running out of oil itself, but rather its ability to produce high-quality cheap and economically extractable oil on demand. After more than fifty years of research and analysis on the subject by the most widely respected & rational scientists, it is now clear that the rate at which world oil producers can extract oil is reaching the maximum level possible. This is what is meant by Peak Oil. With great effort and expenditure, the current level of oil production can possibly be maintained for a few more years, but beyond that oil production must begin a permanent & irreversible decline. The Stone Age did not end because of the lack of stones, and the Oil Age won't end because of lack of oil. The issue is lack of further growth, followed by gradual, then steep decline. Dr King Hubbert correctly predicted peaking of USA oil production in the 1970's on this basis.

    It is now widely acknowledged by the world's leading petroleum geologists that more than 95 percent of all recoverable oil has now been found. We therefore know, within a reasonable degree of certainty, the total amount of oil available to us. Any oil well has roughly the same life cycle where the production rate peaks before it goes into terminal decline. This happens when about half of the oil has been recovered from the well. We have consumed approximately half of the world’s total reserve of about 2.5 trillion barrels of conventional oil in the ground when we started drilling the first well at a current rate of over 30 billion a year, meaning the world is nearing its production plateau.

    Worldwide discovery of oil peaked in 1964 and has followed a steady decline since. According to industry consultants IHS Energy, 90% of all known reserves are now in production, suggesting that few major discoveries remain to be made. There have been no significant discoveries of new oil since 2002. In 2001 there were 8 large scale discoveries, and in 2002 there were 3 such discoveries. In 2003 there were no large scale discoveries of oil. Given geologists' sophisticated understanding of the characteristics that would indicate a major oil find, is is highly unlikely that any area large enough to be significant has eluded attention and no amount or kind of technology will alter that. Since 1981 we have consumed oil faster than we have found it, and the gap continues to widen. Developing an area such as the Artic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska has a ten year lead time and would ultimately produce well under 1% of what the world currently consumes (IEA).

    Oil is now being consumed four times faster than it is being discovered, and the situation is becoming critical.



    NOTE: these people want to sell you oil shares ....

    http://oilprice.com/Energy/Crude-Oil/De ... art-1.html

    Debunking the Myth of Peak Oil - Why the Age of Cheap Oil is Far From Over (Part 1)
    Written by Editorial Dept
    Wednesday, 17 March 2010

    If I may, I would like to rebut or add a little objectivity to the flood of “Peak Oil” articles circulating around. When I see another crisis looming in the balance, and dramatized articles that warn of the “Dangers of Peak Oil,” I must question the validity or how this will effect the world, the USA, and you and I personally, and if indeed a crisis is at hand.

    As for world oil, if you ask the right questions, there are several new technologies/methods/alternatives and new finds that can easily supply enough hydrocarbon fuel for the next century or more. The latest new find in the news today, Petroleo Brasileiro SA, Brazil's state-controlled oil company, said its Tupi field may contain as much as 8 billion barrels of oil and natural gas, an amount that could boost the country's reserves by 62 percent.

    But you ask, how can one or two new oil fields make a difference? Wrong question, because the finding of new oil is continuous.

    Over the past 33 years mankind has consumed more than three times the world’s known oil reserves in 1976 – and today proven oil reserves are nearly double what they were before we started. The story with natural gas is even better – here and around the world enormous amounts of natural gas have been found. More will be found. But if you had asked in 1976 what the supply of oil would be like given the demand of 2010, you would have come up with the “Peak Oil” theory then, and we would have supposedly run out of oil decades ago; an ongoing impending crisis.

    I think the key to the argument of Peak Oil, is that it not only ignores the huge amounts of oil yet to be found, but other hydrocarbon fuels as well. Even if the “theory” holds water, which I argue on its face (or in your face, as some so delightedly pointed out), we will not be out of hydrocarbons and our cars stranded on the side of the road during this century. This is the perceived “crisis” of Peak Oil that tells us that declining production and increasing demand will cause a disruption in supply.

    But if we are to be limited in our driving, because of gasoline shortages, we can simply switch over to other alternatives and install a methane tank to convert over to natural gas, right now, today. Or switch to electric. How about fuel cells? Carry a kite or put up a sail. Limited driving due to shortages is the same as higher prices, and are not a crisis, unless the majority can no longer afford it.

    There will never be "no oil" in your lifetime, so relax, and discern the truth for yourself when you get the facts. If you are old enough to read this, your shiny car will have plenty of gasoline for your lifetime. You may not be able to afford it, but the world cannot possibly run out. Allow me to explain.

    Whenever there is GREAT change, there is also GREAT opportunity. It is impossible to be otherwise. Instead of worrying about the black hole right now, look for new opportunities... it won't take long, they're EVERYWHERE.

    Now that oil is $80/bbl, it opens the door to production of different grades of oil and different kinds of oil, and new places that oil was never thought to exist.

    America has developed new technologies to develop oil production from the many known shale oil fields containing a trillion barrels of oil, that has never been tapped until two years ago, because it was too expensive to extract, and the technology has not yet been improved enough to tackle it before then. But money solves a lot of problems, and $100/bbl oil would certainly do it. You will have to be surprised how fast the technology will ramp up when there's a profit to be made. Just type in “shale oil reserves” into your little Search Bar, and you’ll come up with hundreds of new projects that have never before been thought possible. And these are primarily domestic, where the oil in America was thought to be depleted!

    Ever heard of the Bakken Formation? No? Why not? GOOGLE it, or follow this link. It will blow your mind. http://www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=1911
    At first the Bakken field was thought to be the largest domestic oil discovery in the USA since Alaska's Prudhoe Bay, but has since been downsized, then increased 25 fold by the USGS when shale production is taken into account. There’s enough crude to fully fuel the American economy for 40 years straight. And because this is light, sweet oil, those billions of barrels will cost Americans just $16 PER BARREL! Well, except we know those damn oil barrons are going to gouge us, but cheap oil nonetheless.

    Another example of huge unexpected and unknown reserves are the "Coal Oil" sands in Canada that they are already extracting by truck and converting to usable oil. It's slower to extract and convert than to simply produce liquid oil, but the one field they are producing from today is bigger than the Saudi field, which is the biggest in the world. And that isn't the only "Coal Oil" field in Canada, and certainly not the only one in the world. These Coal Oil fields contain almost as much oil as the Saudi Arabian oil fields.

    Most people don't realize that we only produce about 20% of the oil from a producing oil sand (conventional production), and leave the rest of it there because it was too expensive to produce by secondary or tertiary recovery methods. That is no longer true, so the natural oil reserves just doubled, when the price of oil doubled.

    One more real obvious report is the the Stansberry Report from 2006. Hidden only 1,000 feet beneath the surface of the Rocky Mountains lies several more billion barrels (again, this report was an overestimation in the beginning, but still a huge find).

    Governments don’t care about the truth or the facts and are good at creating crisis after crisis, so that they can be your friend and be the only one to solve the problem, that is, by taking control, taking your rights, enacting more laws, forming more committees out of their cousins, and generally living like Kings off of years of perceived crisis. Oh yeah, and they can take over whole countries if they need to and the gullible public is behind them on an invasion, and they can get enough young people to fight their special-interest wars for them.

    No sir, the only real perceived crisis here is that the great masses of people will figure out that there is not a shortage, but rather an EXCESS of oil, for centuries to come, and that the price of oil should be back down around $20/bbl. Whatta ya’ know, we’ve been lied to again.

    When I was in college in the 1970's, the known problem of that time was that temperatures were getting "colder." By the year 2030, it would be so cold that plants could not live and man would face extinction without drastically changing things. That was to be in my lifetime.

    But now the "experts" claim "Global Warming." It's all just a theory, like Evolution, but after so many "experts" parrot the "truth" in the media, and even colleges and universities begin teaching it as truth, then it becomes "truth,' even when at best it's a 50-50 shot. I’ve read that 63% of those surveyed were “concerned” about Global Warming. Geez, don’t people even know how to ask the right questions anymore?

    Why make a crisis out of something? There's money to be made, control to be taken, and new gov't offices to fill. And of course, the 30-year cooling trend that prompted the global cooling scare in the mid-70s abruptly ended in the late 70s, replaced by with a 20-year warming trend that peaked in 1998.

    Watch this short video from the founder of the Weather Channel how he blows Al Gore's climate change scam out the window showing the fallacy of the concept of "global warming".
    http://www.kusi.com/home/78477082.html?video=pop&t=a

    What I’m really arguing is not only is there enough oil, but really an excess, but that the new discoveries and technologies and alternatives will buy us enough time for the whole Peak Oil thing to be prolonged into the next century, which means there is no crisis. At least, there is nothing yet to have a war over. No, natural gas cannot replace oil, but all of the alternatives together with new technologies and hydrocarbon finds shows me there is no crisis or emergency of shortage during this century. I would think that within this century, some yet undiscovered energy source or method of extracting energy from hydrogen or even something as crazy as a water fuel cell will be discovered. Biofuels look promising as a cheap growable and rampable alternative to diesel fuel, already field testing. Just convert all the trucks on the road away from oil dependency, and you've made a huge impact.

    Part 2 of this article can be found at: Peak Oil debunked - Part 2
    ................ I exist only to amuse myself ................
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    I personally feel that this message board, Jacurutu, is full of hateful folks who don't know
    how to fully interact with people.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 06 Apr 2011 15:29

    the first paragraph of this one is so fucking out-there,
    I don't know what to make of it; some more independent
    research is screaming at me right now ... also, at this
    time, I have no fucking clue who runs this webpage or
    why ... altho I just assume it's the oil companies &
    NASA scientists ...


    http://climaterealists.com/index.php?id=6261


    Russians Debunk Peak Oil Theory - as Bogus as Greenhouse Gas Scam
    by John O'Sullivan, guest post at Climate Realists
    Wednesday, September 8th 2010, 6:55 AM EDT
    Co2sceptic (Site Admin)


    Russians prove ‘fossil’ fuel is junk science theory linked to global warming hype. Oil is shown to be mineral in origin-not from fossilized organisms. No more fears over shrinking reserves as experts say petroleum is naturally ‘renewable.’

    Yes, you read that right and over 2,000 eastern European peer-reviewed science papers sinisterly ignored by western governments and the mainstream media back up the claims.

    Since the mid 20th century scientists have known that the fossil fuel theory is bogus and have compellingly demonstrated that petroleum is derived from highly compressed mineral deposits deep beneath the surface. But the most startling consequence to these findings is that oil is a constant renewable regenerating in nature.

    Since the Middle East oil crisis of the 1970’s gasoline suppliers have stoked media fears that our planet’s reserves are fast in decline. The term ‘peak oil’ was coined and we were told ‘fossil fuels’ would have to become increasingly more expensive as our insatiable appetite drank this ‘finite’ liquid energy source dry.

    Such propaganda suited the interests of the oil industry and western government who systematically bolstered a weak scientific theory very much mirroring the greenhouse gas theory scam that was the vehicle for taxing emissions of carbon dioxide.



    Both stories have been acted out by universal media connivance and scientists and government-funded academia were systematically kept in lockstep for decades with funding strings attached.

    Repositioning Theory as Fact

    All these years the terms ‘peak oil’ and ‘fossil fuels’ have been synonymous. They imply we are inexorably faced with diminishing natural resources and the days of cheap carbon-based energy are gone. Supplanted in the public consciousness as real we grew to accept the inevitable coming of ever-higher energy prices as a consequence of our consumer lifestyle.

    Journalists gleaned their own ‘evidence’ for such an apocalyptic narrative from bleak books such as James Howard Kunstler’s ‘The Long Emergency: Surviving the End of Oil, Climate Change, and Other Converging Catastrophes of the Twenty-First Century’ and Richard Heinberg’s ‘The Party’s Over: Oil, War and the Fate of Industrial Societies’ among others and the public were sold on the fears.

    Constantly fed a diet of this garbage our collective unconsciousness unwittingly allowed the repositioning of Hubbert’s Theory of Peak Oil into fossil fuel fact.

    As a consequence, in 2005, Congressional Representative Roscoe G. Bartlett, Republican of Maryland, and Senator Tom Udall, a New Mexico Democrat created the Congressional Peak Oil Caucus and at a stroke turned

    Scientists who dissented from the groupspeak were vilified or ignored. In the 1980s distinguished British scientist, Sir Fred Hoyle FRS was one who tried and failed to expose the chicanery of proponents of the fossil fuel theory and diminishing world oil reserves. Hoyle, without the benefit of the worldwide web tried repeatedly to expose this flimflam,

    “The suggestion that petroleum might have arisen from some transformation of squashed fish or biological detritus is surely the silliest notion to have been entertained by substantial numbers of persons over an extended period of time.”

    Along with Hoyle other western scientists refused to toe the politically correct line as evidenced in an increasing number of articles to redress the balance about petroleum economics. While several papers by Professor Michael C. Lynch of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology also exposed the myth of “oil exhaustion”¬†and demonstrating the high-pressure genesis of petroleum. No media voice for them either.

    Russia Becomes World’s Next Energy Superpower

    Only in Russia, a nation that has eschewed military supremacy to become a global economic power, did Hoyle’s and Lynch’s words find a welcome community of like-minded scientists. Indeed, outside of the English-speaking world there is no controversy and its common parlance that oil is a mineral, not a biological product and as such our planet has endless untapped reserves.

    As a consequence of applying this knowledge Russia has gone from strength to strength astutely capitalising on its ‘liquid gold’ reserves. “I would describe the mindset right now among the Russian political elite as infused with ‘petroconfidence’,” So says Cliff Kupchan of the Eurasia Group, in an interview with the BBC.

    Indeed, between 1951-2001, thousands of articles and many books and monographs were published mainly in the mainstream Russian scientific journals proving abiotic petroleum origins - all ignored by western governments and media. For example, leading expert V. A. Krayushkin has alone published more than two hundred fifty articles on modern petroleum geology, and several books.

    Russian mineralogists, oil explorers and each successive government since the dark days of the former Soviet Union have been unalterably upbeat that they’ve ousted the ‘peak oil, fossil fuels’ nonsense. And who are we to argue - they’ve got the money in the bank to prove it.

    As a result Russia is firmly ensconced as the world’s second-largest oil exporter and is becoming so preeminent in the field of oil and gas exploration and innovation that the nation is set to usurp the U.S. not as a military force, but as the world’s energy superpower for the 21st century

    Oil—Our Greatest Natural Renewable Energy Source

    Exploiting their cutting-edge technology Russia has successfully discovered numerous petroleum fields, a number of which produce either partly or entirely from a crystalline basement and which appears distinctly self-replenishing. Yes, you read that right—Russia enjoys the best naturally renewable energy source—petroleum! No billions wasted on wind farms, solar or wave white elephants here.

    Indeed, to our former soviet cousins, the idea of ‘peak oil’ is laughable because, if they’re calculations are right, oil is the most bountiful, most efficient and cheapest renewable fuel and will last at least for many hundreds of years to come.

    Disgruntled that the Russians have been allowed to take such a big lead the brightest and the best in the west are now using the blogosphere in helping to forge resurgence against the fossil fuel, peak oil myth. So says Daniel Yergin, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “The Prize: The Epic Quest for Oil, Money and Power” and chairman of IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates, a company that advises governments and industry.

    Yergin like others cites the compelling evidence that the MSM won’t show you; these anti-fossil fuel theorists cite alkanes, kerogens and many other petroleum related chemicals that have been found on meteorites—which we know can support no organic life and thus proving the lie of the fossil fuel theory.

    Why are We Still Being Lied to?

    Indeed, so lame has the fossil fuel theory become that even its most strident supporters are unable to muster the flimsiest of evidence for their position. In “The Abiotic Oil Controversy” key proponent of the abiotic (fossil) origin, Richard Heinberg admits his case is exposed as threadbare lamenting,

    “Perhaps one day there will be general agreement that at least some oil is indeed abiotic. Maybe there are indeed deep methane belts twenty miles below the Earth’s surface.”

    So scant is the evidence to support Heinberg and other western pro-fossil fuel theorists that in researching his article ‘The Evidence for Limitless Oil and Gas’ (Digital Journal), Bill Jencks reveals,

    “I searched the internet including Google Scholar and there seems to be no ‘absolute proof’ or support from direct modern research for the Biogenic Theory of oil and gas formation. This theory—for want of a better word—seems to be greatly ‘assumed’ by geologists throughout geological research.”

    Like me, Jencks found a mountain of evidence backing Russian claims. From the Joint Institute of the Physics of the Earth Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow we find incredible sources as revealed by A Dissertation by J.F. Kenney which condemns the outmoded 18th century ”anarchaic hypothesis” that petroleum somehow (miraculously) evolved from biological detritus, and is accordingly limited in abundance.

    Instead, the fossil fuels hypothesis has been replaced during the past forty years by the modern Russian-Ukrainian theory of deep, abiotic petroleum origins which has established that petroleum is a primordial material erupted from great depth. Kenney states,

    “Therefore, petroleum abundances are limited by little more than the quantities of its constituents as were incorporated into the Earth at the time of its formation; and its availability depends upon technological development and exploration competence.”

    In a straight scientific shootout Peak Oil Theory vs Russian-Ukraine Modern Theory the Russians win hands down. But it remains a peculiar anachronism that there is no body of American or other English language peer review to verify or disprove the Russian science.

    But why are we still being lied to? With such unwillingness to correct these intellectual failings it is little wonder that there is growing dissatisfaction among voters and thinkers in English-speaking nations and the EU. Those who study carefully the facts now reasonably conclude that beyond the media hard sell there is no energy crisis; the world has a plentiful supply of cheap renewable petroleum and another enviro-myth needs to be mercilessly culled.

    References:
    Kudryavtsev N.A., 1959. Geological proof of the deep origin of Petroleum. Trudy Vsesoyuz. Neftyan. Nauch. Issledovatel Geologoraz Vedoch. Inst. No.132, pp. 242-262 (In Russian)

    Kudryavtsev N.A., 1951. Against the organic hypothesis of oil origin. Oil Economy Jour. [Neftyanoe khoziaystvo], no. 9. - pp. 17-29 (in Russian)
    ................ I exist only to amuse myself ................
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    I personally feel that this message board, Jacurutu, is full of hateful folks who don't know
    how to fully interact with people.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 06 Apr 2011 15:30

    this is from a snotty little blahgger,
    but that don't mean he ain't right ...
    he's just an asshole ...

    http://peakoildebunked.blogspot.com/

    Friday, June 25, 2010
    427. PEAK OIL SNOOZE-ATHON CONTINUES

    Hi everyone.
    I've been on a long vacation from peak oil because it's so boring and irrelevant to daily life, but today I'd like to pop back in for an update on the situation.

    Has anything happened? Not really, if by "happened" you mean any of the things the doomers predicted.

    I first began writing on peak oil 6 years ago, in the summer of 2004. Matt Savinar was predicting imminent TEOTWAWKI, and telling folks to run for the hills. Now, 6 years later, I can go out on the street, and nothing whatsoever has changed since 2004. The streets are still clogged with cars going on mindless journeys. People are sleeping in their cars with the engine running to power the air-conditioning. Oil is at $75 and it's not going anywhere. Food prices and availability are completely normal. Plastic Hello Kitty paraphernalia is as plentiful and cheap as ever. Peak oil continues to be a ridiculously over-hyped non-event, just like I always predicted. I thumb my nose at it with impunity. LOL.

    The Oil Drum doesn't even bother with new posts anymore. Just recycled versions of the same old "oil spill" post, flopping over and over like a flat tire, wump wump wump. Quite a comedown from the heady days of A Nosedive Toward the Desert in 2007.

    Yup, peak oil is yesterday's party. The IEA is yawning and predicting oversupply of oil until 2015. Lucky us. Five more years of "topics for discussion" from Gail the Actuary
    Source

    Matt Simmons' ongoing nervous breakdown continues to blossom in fascinating ways. Last week he predicted a mass evacuation of gulf states:
    "We're going to have to evacuate the gulf states," said Matt Simmons, founder of Simmons and Co., an oil investment firm and, since the April 20 blowout, the unflagging source of end-of-the-world predictions. "Can you imagine evacuating 20 million people? ... This story is 80 times worse than I thought."Source Yah, that's some funny stuff. I think Matt Simmons is about 80 times more mentally unstable than I thought.



    More hysterical bullshit from Matt Simmons:
    "Mexico's ability to export oil will be over by the end of 2009."
    (Spoken prediction made at 35:50 of the interview available here)
    The reality:
    Mexico exported 1.59 million barrels of crude per day in May 2010.
    Source

    Speaking of the mentally ill, Mike Ruppert predicted that a nuke would be used on the gulf oil spill in a week to 10 days. That was a month ago. LOL.
    "I predict that US Continuity of Government provisions will be activated and that FEMA will, before end of summer, be placed in complete control of the Southeast United States… limited martial law." Source

    Colin Campbell, the pope of peak oil, recently caved and became a peak demand believer.

    "I have changed my point of view about future prices," said Campbell, who used to think the peak in conventional oil production, which he believes happened in 2005, would lead to a relentless price surge.

    Instead, the record rally led to a peak in demand in the developed world.

    "Peak oil drives prices up in the first place. It has its own mechanism. We're sort of at peak demand right now," Campbell told Reuters from his home in the village of Ballydehob, West Cork. "I think presently the price limit is about $100."Source

    Good job Colin, you ridiculous dumbass. You would have figured that out a long time ago if you had the sense to read Peak Oil Debunked.


    Hey, and whatever happened to the much-ballyhooed Export Land Model (insert scary organ chords)? And Jeffrey Brown's 2005 prediction:

    "As I said last year, I expect that by the end of 2006 we will be in the teeth of a ferocious net oil export crisis."Source

    Stay tuned folks. I've got a few more doomers to scalp before I'm finished.
    ................ I exist only to amuse myself ................
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    I personally feel that this message board, Jacurutu, is full of hateful folks who don't know
    how to fully interact with people.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 06 Apr 2011 15:30

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2 ... r-peak-oil

    What Japan's disaster tells us about peak oil
    Life for survivors after the Japanese earthquake and tsunami gives a clue to what a peak oil world would look like



    For large parts of eastern Japan that were not directly hit by the tsunami on 11 March 2011, including the nation's capital, the current state of affairs feels very much like a dry-run for peak oil. This is not to belittle the tragic loss of life and the dire situation facing many survivors left without homes and livelihoods. Rather, the aim here is to reflect upon the post-disaster events and compare them with those normally associated with the worst-case scenarios for peak oil.

    The earthquake and tsunami affected six of the 28 oil refineries in Japan and immediately petrol rationing was introduced with a maximum of 20 litres per car (in some instances as low as 5 litres). On 14 March, the government allowed the oil industry to release 3 days' worth of oil from stockpiles and on 22 March an additional 22 days' worth of oil was released.

    The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), which serves a population of 44.5 million, lost one quarter of its supply capacity as a result of the quake, through the closedown of its two Fukushima nuclear power plants (Dai-ichi and Dai-ni), as well as eight fossil fuel based thermal power stations. Subsequently, from 14 March 2011 onwards, TEPCO was forced to implement a series of scheduled outages across the Kanto region (the prefectures of Gunma, Tochigi, Ibaraki, Saitama, Tokyo, Chiba, and Kanagawa).

    While the thermal power stations may restart operations soon, the overall shortfall will become even more difficult to manage over the summer period when air conditioning is utilized. The reality is that these power cuts could continue for years, especially since the one of the two Fukushima nuclear plants has effectively become a pile of radioactive scrap.

    Related to this, when the Tokyo Metropolitican Government began to announce levels of radioactive contamination of drinking water above permissible levels, this was immediately followed by the rapid sell-out of bottled water, even after the levels dropped again. When bottled water is on sale in local convenience stores after some restocking took place, each customer is only allowed to purchase one 2 litre bottle.

    Immediately after the quake, supermarkets outside the disaster area in Tokyo and other major cities began to sell out of foodstuffs, including various instant meals. The electrical appliance stores sold out of batteries, flashlights and portable radios.

    As we all know, the twin natural and human tragedies are having impacts beyond the Tohoku region where Fukushima lies, and the Greater Tokyo area. It has been difficult for Japan's notoriously efficient industries to maintain production, given that they rely on just-in-time systems and which have supply plants (for needed parts) that are located in the zone impacted by these combined disasters. One example is in car production, where major firms have had to suspend work at their factories when key parts are no longer available from the affected region. The fragility of this system of industrial production is glaringly obvious and it is something that peak oil commentators have warned of multiple times.

    These food and bottled water shortages, power cuts, fuel-rationing and breakdowns in just-in-time manufacturing have been anticipated by those who take peak oil seriously. It is almost as if eastern Japan is experiencing a peak oil rehearsal, although other regions of Japan are virtually unaffected. If proponents of peak oil are correct, then the rest of the world may experience something similar within the next 5 to 10 years, and hence it is important that we learn valuable lessons from Japan's response to the current circumstances.

    What makes the current situation different from peak oil?
    Under a peak oil scenario, the entire world (not just one country) would be affected by a continuous decline in global oil production. The rate of that decline is the key factor. If the rate is very gradual (a few percent points each year), then economies and their food and energy production and distribution systems in particular will have more time to adapt.

    In such circumstances, we could envisage a significant decline in the flow of goods and people across the globe — a slowing or a potentially grinding halt. For a country like Japan that relies heavily on the import of food, having only 40% self-sufficiency, the real peak oil scenario would have dire impacts.

    Under the present situation, Japan can still rely on imports to alleviate food supply problems. This is fortunate as over 600 farms, 125 harbours and 2,333 fishing vessels were destroyed by the tsunami, not to mention the thousands of people who made their livelihoods from agriculture and fishing who are either deceased or displaced. Furthermore, the 20-30 km zone around the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant may not be used for food production for some time to come and the good reputations of those areas for providing clean produce may take even longer to be restored.

    In a global peak oil scenario, it is highly likely that food prices would increase significantly. To some extent this is happening. For instance, in February 2011 it was reported that food prices reached a record high due to poor harvests, rising oil prices (at US$105 per barrel) and increasing demand for foodstuffs due to rising population and incomes. The conflict in Libya was predicted to further exacerbate the food and oil prices. In fact, conflict and civil unrest in oil producing countries is another facet of various peak oil scenarios as nations scramble for the remaining resources. It is something that Richard Heinberg describes as the "last one standing" scenario in which powerful countries will use their assets to promote their own survival at the expense of everyone else.

    So in the current predicament facing Japan, the situation is ameliorated by the ability of different nations to offer support and continue trading (for instance, Evian is selling a lot of bottled water to Japan at the moment). This certainly would be more difficult under some of the extreme peak oil scenarios, where rapid oil decline is involved.

    Lessons from Japan
    While the consequences of the current disaster for Japan have been tragic in terms of the loss of life and while it is clear that the emotional, psychological and economic impacts are enormous, there are real signs of hope.

    The first important lesson to recognize is the way that Japan's leaders acted rapidly and responsibly. We have already indicated that fuel rationing was in place from 12 March 2011. The reality is that Japan is one of the most disaster-prepared nations in the world and regularly undertakes wide-scale drills. This practice proved to be of vital importance in helping people, communities and institutions cope with the major challenges that they have had to face.

    Government officials quickly recognized that people were hoarding food supplies and began to publicly request that they only buy what they need. This was followed up by a series of public service announcements by the Japan Ad Council under theme of "What I can do now."

    The Minister in charge of consumer affairs,
    Renho Murata, frequently called on people not to panic buy and hoard food. She argued that this kind of activity was undermining the ability to provide relief supplies to the quake hit areas. At the same time, the general public and the private sector in the Kanto region were encouraged to comply with the scheduled power outages and to significantly reduce their energy consumption. Everybody responded positively – keen to play their part in solving this problem.

    Prime Minister Naoto Kan in particular made an appeal to the people of Japan on 13 March 2011 when he said, "We Japanese have overcome many very trying situations in the past to create our modern society of peace and prosperity. I firmly believe that through our citizens working together to respond to this great earthquake and tsunami, we will certainly be able to overcome this crisis."

    This message has been echoed across the media and the Japanese public has responded by showing calmness, patience, respect for each other and mutual support. If anything, they have exemplified Richard Heinberg's power down scenario — the path of cooperation, conservation and sharing. Whether they can hold true to this path over a prolonged period of time remains to be seen.

    In the global Transition Movement, they often refer to the "head, heart and hand" approach to coping with peak oil and climate change, as discussed in Rob Hopkin's Transition Handbook. Put simply, the head signifies the exploration needed about how we can re-orient our lives to become more local and small scale as our awareness increases of the energy crisis we are heading into. The heart symbolizes how we can generate positive visions of the future and how they can be harnessed to overcome the feelings of powerlessness in the face of these immense challenges. The hands are a representation about understanding how the transition model can be employed in practice for specific communities.

    For many communities in eastern Japan, the current circumstances represent the first time they have had to consider questions about food and energy security. The vast majority appear, quite naturally, to share the overwhelming desire to get back to normal, back to the way things were before. But there are also signs of the head, heart and hand approach as many Japanese commentators are asking questions about how will develop in the future.

    If Japan is to build back better, then it should perhaps do so by building more resilient, more locally oriented communities in the areas affected by the quake and tsunami, and beyond. In fact, this is a chance to reconsider completely the development path for Japan towards one that is less vulnerable, less reliant upon fossil fuels, and ideally a low carbon society.

    To borrow the words of Prime Minister Kan once again when he called upon his compatriots:

    "Through this resolve, let us all now — each and every individual — firmly reinforce our bonds with our families, friends, and communities, overcoming this crisis to once more build an even better Japan."
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 06 Apr 2011 15:32

    http://www.peakoil.net/

    Welcome to ASPO International

    ASPO is a network of scientists and others, having an interest in determining the date and impact of the peak and decline of the world's production of oil and gas, due to resource constraints. Read more.

    On this page you will find news related to ASPO International, or any of its national organizations. For more news related to Peak Oil, see the News section on our links page.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 06 Apr 2011 15:34

    fan-tastic ...

    now I'm fatigued and just don't give a fuck ...

    gonna go fire up a 1939 Ford Diesel Guzzling Tractor
    and plow for the hell of it ...
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 06 Apr 2011 23:14

    hey, y'all, nevermind ... I done found my answer ...

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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 06 Apr 2011 23:27

    shit, even John Stossel says it's a myth ....



    on the other hand :


    no matter how many times I see that,
    it always makes me laugh & laugh & laugh ...
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 06 Apr 2011 23:30

    fuck, I love YouTube .... makes me wish I hadn't've been such a hard-ass
    and sprung for the satellite internet a long time ago ...

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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby D Pope » 07 Apr 2011 11:04

    Here's a recipie for oil.

    http://www.pnas.org/content/99/17/10976.abstract

    The evolution of multicomponent systems at high pressures: VI. The thermodynamic stability of the hydrogen–carbon system: The genesis of hydrocarbons and the origin of petroleum
    J. F. Kenney†‡§, Vladimir A. Kutcherov¶, Nikolai A. Bendeliani∥, and Vladimir A. Alekseev∥
    + Author Affiliations

    †Gas Resources Corporation, 11811 North Parkway, Floor 5, Houston, TX 77060; ‡Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute of Earth Physics, Bolshaya Gruzinskaya 10, 123810 Moscow, Russia; ¶Russian State University of Oil and Gas, Leninski Prospect 65, 117917 Moscow, Russia; and ∥Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for High Pressure Physics, 142092 Troitsk, Moscow Region, Russia
    Communicated by Howard Reiss, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (received for review April 3, 2002)

    Abstract
    The spontaneous genesis of hydrocarbons that comprise natural petroleum have been analyzed by chemical thermodynamic-stability theory. The constraints imposed on chemical evolution by the second law of thermodynamics are briefly reviewed, and the effective prohibition of transformation, in the regime of temperatures and pressures characteristic of the near-surface crust of the Earth, of biological molecules into hydrocarbon molecules heavier than methane is recognized. For the theoretical analysis of this phenomenon, a general, first-principles equation of state has been developed by extending scaled particle theory and by using the technique of the factored partition function of the simplified perturbed hard-chain theory. The chemical potentials and the respective thermodynamic Affinity have been calculated for typical components of the H–C system over a range of pressures between 1 and 100 kbar (1 kbar = 100 MPa) and at temperatures consistent with those of the depths of the Earth at such pressures. The theoretical analyses establish that the normal alkanes, the homologous hydrocarbon group of lowest chemical potential, evolve only at pressures greater than ≈30 kbar, excepting only the lightest, methane. The pressure of 30 kbar corresponds to depths of ≈100 km. For experimental verification of the predictions of the theoretical analysis, a special high-pressure apparatus has been designed that permits investigations at pressures to 50 kbar and temperatures to 1,500°C and also allows rapid cooling while maintaining high pressures. The high-pressure genesis of petroleum hydrocarbons has been demonstrated using only the reagents solid iron oxide, FeO, and marble, CaCO3, 99.9% pure and wet with triple-distilled water.
    Leto II is gone for good, except for OM. The "pearl" was just that; a miniscule portion of what Leto was, and not a compressed version of the whole. The pearl that the worms have do not make them Leto, or in any way similar to him.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby D Pope » 07 Apr 2011 11:29

    Russians prove ‘fossil’ fuel is junk science theory linked to global warming hype. Oil is shown to be mineral in origin-not from fossilized organisms. No more fears over shrinking reserves as experts say petroleum is naturally ‘renewable.’

    I don't think i'd go with that first sentance but I don't doubt that they're on to something here.

    Audio from this Kenney fellow on Science Friday, not sure how to post just the audio so here's the link.
    Starts around 14 and goes to 32.

    http://www.sciencefriday.com/pages/2002 ... 82302.html
    Leto II is gone for good, except for OM. The "pearl" was just that; a miniscule portion of what Leto was, and not a compressed version of the whole. The pearl that the worms have do not make them Leto, or in any way similar to him.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby E. LeGuille » 19 Apr 2011 04:42

    I have always read both sides on this, and have become completely confused. There are so many said untapped reserves, such as in Alaska. Yet, they say we have Peak Oil, then we have oil that continuously regnerates. Then we have the theories, that Oil acts for the Earth's mantle & core, as it does for an engine and it's gears' operations. It's thought now that the oil acts as a cooling method for the mantle to ensure that the core does not turn it into a hotbed. I am not sure how much I buy into any of these theories, since when it comes down to it, someone wants your money.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby SandRider » 19 Apr 2011 11:09

    the only thing I know to do is what I have always done in similar situations -
    keep an eye on it, try to parse out the horseshit from both sides, wait and see -

    set some rational milestones & gauge which way things are going ...
    if total production is in decline as consumption continues to increase,
    and the actual global tipping-point was reached anywhere between the
    mid-70s to the nineties, the squeeze due to scarcity should begin at any time ....

    american civilian consumer gasoline will reach $4.50 to $5 this summer
    (BTW, I'd appreciate all y'all posting when it busts four dollars in your area, if it hasn't already)
    if we do not see the gradual traditional decline in price after Labor Day,
    but consumer gas stays above $4 thru the winter, with an even higher peak-demand price
    next summer, that would be an indication that the base consumer price had been adjusted
    upwards ... what I mean there is that I am watching for the moment in time when the
    "normal" cycles of market-price for consumer gasoline, and barrel-crude, do not fluctuate
    in historical patterns, but rise to new base levels ...

    but in the short-term, say the next 5 years, that in itself wouldn't prove or bust Peak Oil,
    because of the cocksuckers in the government and oil companies who are goddamn good
    at manipulating prices to project whatever economic view that best suits their agendas,
    and these days, fuck even knows what their agendas are ...

    the best one I can come up with is tires ... there are 7 gallons of oil in the average car tire;
    I think that right before consumer gasoline becomes too expensive for the average person,
    the topic will be the ridiculous price of tires ...

    so if you wake up one day and all the normal, average people around you are talking about
    how worn out their tires are, and agonizing over the decision to "invest" in new ones, and
    rednecks around the world start selling "refurbished" tires .... the end is nigh ...
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby Robspierre » 19 Apr 2011 21:23

    $3.69 for regular unleaded where I fill up normally, they have 87 octane vs the normal 86 at other places. You see a lot of 86 octane here because of the altitude, I do see a difference between octane's, about 20 miles less driven if I have to fill up with 86.

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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby Omphalos » 19 Apr 2011 22:00

    Low octane stuff here in Ca is well above $4. Just filled the Mouse's BM'er with hi-test for $4.40.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby Freakzilla » 20 Apr 2011 08:10

    It's just under $4 here for premium. $60 got me a little under 16 gallons yesterday.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby Robspierre » 20 Apr 2011 18:42

    Diesel just jumped from $3.99 9/10 to $4.19 9/10 today.

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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby E. LeGuille » 21 Apr 2011 03:30

    Robspierre wrote:Diesel just jumped from $3.99 9/10 to $4.19 9/10 today.

    Rob


    In areas where Ethanol is big, Diesel has gone up significantly. Ethanol, which was supposed to help in corn production, made the food prices go UP because Diesel went up, meaning transportation costs went up. Now, food prices are up, food sales are down, and farmers are getting bought out by commercial planters and cheap handling procedures. Yay.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby Freakzilla » 21 Apr 2011 13:07

    $3.99 for Premium
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby Serkanner » 21 Apr 2011 14:03

    Whiners ... petrol in Holland: $ 9.65 a gallon
    "... the mystery of life isn't a problem to solve but a reality to experience."

    “There is no escape—we pay for the violence of our ancestors.”

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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby Freakzilla » 21 Apr 2011 15:40

    Serkanner wrote:Whiners ... petrol in Holland: $ 9.65 a gallon


    Is that in Pesos or US Dollars?
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby Serkanner » 21 Apr 2011 15:55

    Freakzilla wrote:
    Serkanner wrote:Whiners ... petrol in Holland: $ 9.65 a gallon


    Is that in Pesos or US Dollars?


    I kid you not ... it is in US dollars.
    "... the mystery of life isn't a problem to solve but a reality to experience."

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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby E. LeGuille » 21 Apr 2011 19:47

    The problem versus many countries, is that America is built entirely on the corporate/consumer model. Gas goes up, price for consumption goes up. Since America is built on the Corporate model, where local is affected by national chains, then it is affected by the highest price average, not by local state price.

    In other parts of the world, where local shops are still prominent -- like in Australia -- many of the food prices, etc, stay the same due to the average price of transportation cost. When a local chain buys from a local supplier, then the overall cost to transport, is lower. In companies like McD's, they have to pay to transport according to national average. Their supplier comes from 1 place: Golden Arches Foods, Inc. If the cost to transport from this location goes up, so does the food cost of McD's. Thus why they are raising prices.
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    Re: Peak Oil

    Postby Omphalos » 21 Apr 2011 20:50

    And then one time, at band camp...
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