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Chapter 30

Posted: 12 Feb 2008 17:52
by Freakzilla
This Fremen religious adaptation, then, is the source of what we now recognize
as "The Pillars of the Universe," whose Qizara Tafwid are among us all with
signs and proofs and prophecy. They bring us the Arrakeen mystical fusion whose
profound beauty is typified by the stirring music built on the old forms, but
stamped with the new awakening. Who has not heard and been deeply moved by "The
Old Man's Hymn"?

I drove my feet through a desert
Whose mirage fluttered like a host.
Voracious for glory, greedy for danger,
I roamed the horizons of al-Kulab,
Watching time level mountains
In its search and its hunger for me.
And I saw the sparrows swiftly approach,
Bolder than the onrushing wolf.
They spread in the tree of my youth.
I heard the flock in my branches
And was caught on their beaks and claws!

-from "Arrakis Awakening" by the Princess Irulan

Liet Kynes has been left in the desert to die without stillsuit or water. He's semi-delerious yet he still can't stop being an ecologist. He can smell a dangerous spice blow in the sands beneath him. He hears the voice of his father, lecturing him on ecology. He hopes his Fremen friends will see the vultures circling above him and come to investigate. The thought of the water in the pre-spice mass below him is madening. A worm is sure to come to the spice blow but he has no maker hooks to mount it. In a flash of realization, Kynes realizes what a hero to the people could do in this landscape. He has already sent word to the Fremen to look for and protect Paul and Jessica. The birds on the sand near him flee as a gas bubble lifts him then swallows him in the sand. His dying thoughts are that his father and all the other scientists were wrong, that the most persistent principles of the universe were accident and error.

Posted: 03 Apr 2009 17:34
by Sev
Possibly my favourite chapter of the entire book. Was it one of Frank's as well? - after all he did choose it for the 'Dune' extract in the British 'Best of...' collection in 1975 edited by Angus Wells.
The introduction to the extract is as follows:

Go to any ten science fiction fans and ask them to name their favourite novels. You'll get some pretty disparate answers, but I'll bet that amongst the majority favourites you'll find Dune.
It's been a cult book for some time now - and it's certainly one of the all-time greats - so it would be difficult to compile a collection of Frank Herbert's best work without it.
This extract is Frank's own choice and (needless to say) it's a good one.
I won't even try to outline the story. If you haven't read it yet go out and buy it. Now.

Posted: 03 Apr 2009 19:27
by Seraphan
Sev wrote:Possibly my favourite chapter of the entire book. Was it one of Frank's as well? - after all he did choose it for the 'Dune' extract in the British 'Best of...' collection in 1975 edited by Angus Wells.
The introduction to the extract is as follows:

Go to any ten science fiction fans and ask them to name their favourite novels. You'll get some pretty disparate answers, but I'll bet that amongst the majority favourites you'll find Dune.
It's been a cult book for some time now - and it's certainly one of the all-time greats - so it would be difficult to compile a collection of Frank Herbert's best work without it.
This extract is Frank's own choice and (needless to say) it's a good one.
I won't even try to outline the story. If you haven't read it yet go out and buy it. Now.

I think it was one of Beverly Herbert's favourites, check the McNelly interview.

Re: Chapter 30

Posted: 28 Nov 2011 13:26
by Freakzilla
Revised

Re: Chapter 30

Posted: 27 Dec 2011 17:44
by Freakzilla
Clean

Re: Chapter 30

Posted: 06 Jan 2014 12:14
by Freakzilla
What was it that Kynes realized as he died?

Re: Chapter 30

Posted: 08 Jan 2014 10:40
by Apjak
I am a desert creature.

Re: Chapter 30

Posted: 08 Jan 2014 10:56
by Freakzilla
Apjak wrote:I am a desert creature.


I think there had to be more to it than that...

He felt the bubble lift him, felt it break and the dust whirlpool engulf
him, dragging him down into cool darkness. For a moment, the sensation of
coolness and the moisture were blessed relief. Then, as his planet killed him,
it occurred to Kynes that his father and all the other scientists were wrong,
that the most persistent principles of the universe were accident and error.

Even the hawks could appreciate these facts.

~Dune

Maybe he was just delusional? I mean, he WAS hallucinating.

Re: Chapter 30

Posted: 09 Jan 2014 07:18
by Serkanner
Freakzilla wrote:
Apjak wrote:I am a desert creature.


I think there had to be more to it than that...

He felt the bubble lift him, felt it break and the dust whirlpool engulf
him, dragging him down into cool darkness. For a moment, the sensation of
coolness and the moisture were blessed relief. Then, as his planet killed him,
it occurred to Kynes that his father and all the other scientists were wrong,
that the most persistent principles of the universe were accident and error.

Even the hawks could appreciate these facts.

~Dune

Maybe he was just delusional? I mean, he WAS hallucinating.


"... persistent principles of the universe were accident and error." The first things that come to mind is "chaos" and "evolution". What were the religeous convictions of these scientists and Kynes father? Were they perhaps followers of the creation theories?

Re: Chapter 30

Posted: 09 Jan 2014 13:03
by Omphalos
Causation? Herbet examines that one a good deal in the following pages.

Re: Chapter 30

Posted: 09 Jan 2014 13:15
by Freakzilla
Serkanner wrote:
Freakzilla wrote:
Apjak wrote:I am a desert creature.


I think there had to be more to it than that...

He felt the bubble lift him, felt it break and the dust whirlpool engulf
him, dragging him down into cool darkness. For a moment, the sensation of
coolness and the moisture were blessed relief. Then, as his planet killed him,
it occurred to Kynes that his father and all the other scientists were wrong,
that the most persistent principles of the universe were accident and error.

Even the hawks could appreciate these facts.

~Dune

Maybe he was just delusional? I mean, he WAS hallucinating.


"... persistent principles of the universe were accident and error." The first things that come to mind is "chaos" and "evolution". What were the religeous convictions of these scientists and Kynes father? Were they perhaps followers of the creation theories?



Maybe it was the opposite, maybe he had a religious revelation? :think:

Re: Chapter 30

Posted: 09 Jan 2014 16:25
by Serkanner
Freakzilla wrote:
Serkanner wrote:
Freakzilla wrote:
Apjak wrote:I am a desert creature.


I think there had to be more to it than that...

He felt the bubble lift him, felt it break and the dust whirlpool engulf
him, dragging him down into cool darkness. For a moment, the sensation of
coolness and the moisture were blessed relief. Then, as his planet killed him,
it occurred to Kynes that his father and all the other scientists were wrong,
that the most persistent principles of the universe were accident and error.

Even the hawks could appreciate these facts.

~Dune

Maybe he was just delusional? I mean, he WAS hallucinating.


"... persistent principles of the universe were accident and error." The first things that come to mind is "chaos" and "evolution". What were the religeous convictions of these scientists and Kynes father? Were they perhaps followers of the creation theories?





Maybe it was the opposite, maybe he had a religious revelation? :think:



:think: ... yeah, you can read that sentence both ways. At least I do, but that might be a non native speaker problem.